Monthly Archives: August 2015

A short lesson on data

You can do a lot of things on the Internet but whatever you do requires data.  The Internet has a lot of data.  Some say roughly 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 GB of data are available but no one really knows the exact amount.

GB is short for gigabytes, or one billion bytes.  We measure the size of data in bytes.  One byte is equivalent to eight bits.  You generally need between one and four of these bytes to represent a single letter in the alphabet, or twenty of them for the average English word.

Data needs to be stored and retrieved.  Hard drives were designed for exactly this purpose.  Twenty years ago it cost $259 to store one GB of data on a hard drive. Today it costs just a few pennies even if people prefer storing their data directly on the Internet.  This serves them well considering their phones and tablets don’t even have traditional hard drives.

Data needs to be uploaded and downloaded on the Internet.  And this requires a network connection that moves data to and from a computer and the Internet. Five years from now the average Internet user will be transfering 37GB a year through their internet connections.

Data can be stolen.  Before the Internet, a thief needed to be physically close to a computer in order to steal the data stored on its hard drive.  After computers started connecting to the Internet, thieves could now steel data from anywhere in the world.

You’re probably wondering why someone would steal another person’s data. A person steals another person’s data in order to hurt them.   Data is simply a recording of all the things people think and do in their lives.  Many times what a person thinks or does should remain private or should only be shared with a very small group of trusted people. This is our basic right but when a person steals our data they violate this right.   Sometimes the people we know and want to share our data with also violate our privacy when they accidentally make it available to someone else. 

Data also helps us make better decisions.   You are probably wondering “I make good decisions without needing data from the Internet,” and this is correct.  You rely on your judgement and intuition to make good decisions and this is how it should be.   With data however, you have a way of learning more about the facts that describe, explain or even predict a problem you are facing. When you take this data and apply some fancy math to it, you have a powerful new tool to help you answer tough questions.    And this is why the Internet is so powerful, it not only contains a lot of data (remember all the bytes I mentioned earlier), but it has the fancy math tools that help people make better decisions.

I know you are probably wondering, “If the Internet helps people make  decisions, can it also decide for itself?”  This is a great question, and makes for a great story another day. 

The lesson here is that data is very important in our lives and this will only increase as you grow older.  Learn to protect your data so it can only be seen by those people you trust.   Always rely on your judgement and intuition to make good decisions and learn how to use data to make better and more informed decisions. 

(for my two young daughters)

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Complexity

Simple is that ‘horse that left the barn’ but remains in your line of sight.  Chase her down and the problem is solved.  Apply best practices in horse management to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

Complicated is trickier.  It’s that feeling of being ‘caught between a rock and a hard place.’  You’re aware of being unaware of how to get out. Nevertheless, you are confident that good survival practices will help navigate you out of this mess soon enough.

Complexity grows each second you ‘grab the bull by the horns.’  Your best bet is to try things, getting a sense for what works and repeat. If you succeed in taming the wild beast, remember to reflect on your experience, teasing out useful knowledge that will help you repeat this success in the future.

chargingbull

We hear these idioms everyday because we encounter these types of problems everyday. Understanding the category of problem we are solving is the first step towards effectively solving it.

The really interesting part is to get better at ordering complex problems, thereby diminishing their complexity, or increasing the order of complicated ones so they become simpler.

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Value

A recent New York Times article suggests that Rome is falling apart.  This may come as no surprise considering similar articles have suggested the same over the past decade.  It is nonetheless strange news for a city and country that are blessed with fourty-eight million tourist to its stunning countrysides, beautiful cities, and cultural treasures each year.

My wife and I moved to Rome in 2009.   I spent many summers in Italy as a child, but it is by living here that I realized the city is dazzling almost entirely through the preservation and promotion of its past success. This has the net effect of pushing aside the practical everyday needs of Romans.

In Thomas Friedman’s much talked about book, The World is Flat, a comparison is made to cities as collaborative platforms for social and economic progress.  As an IT professional, I can tell you that a technology platform’s value hinges on what it offers being fit-for-purpose and how it offers this being fit-for-use.  Rome is prioritizing the preservation of storied relics over the renewal of everyday services.  This makes the city a better fit for the purposes of its visitors than those of its residents.

Similarly, no resident here will resist the notion that Rome is increasingly unfit-for-use.  There are many complex reasons for this. A video that went viral last week may have a simple one.  In it, bus driver Christian Rosso attributes the recent chaos in the city’s public transportation system to the large quantity of city buses parked in the garage awaiting maintenance.  In other words, they are unfit for use and this has exhausted the patience of Rome’s visitors and residents alike.

My point here is not to fuel the nytimes article and its ensuing firestorm.  The fact of the matter is that Rome is one of the nicest cities you’ll ever visit.  However, If the city is to become more valuable to current and future generations of tourists and residents, the mayor and his team need to propose services that satisfy the changing needs of its 21st century residents.  They need to equally ensure these services work and can be relied upon throughout the year by residents and non-residents alike.

Value is an atomic all or nothing proposition.  Uncovering it requires the wisdom and leadership to understand purpose, as well as the knowledge and management to ensure its uninterrupted availability.

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